13/11/2018

Strategic intent as policy intent / Prahald and Hamel.

In their ground breaking HBR article Prahalad and Hamel discuss the value of strategic intent and how it enables organisations to innovate and succeed.

A key part of the text below.

Strategic intent is our term for such an animating dream. It also implies a particular point of view about the long-term mar- ket or competitive position that a firm hopes to build over the coming decade or so. Hence, it conveys a sense of direction. A strategic intent is differentiated; it implies a competitively unique point of view about the future. It holds out to employees the promise of exploring new competitive territory. Hence, it conveys a sense of discovery. Strategic intent has an emotional edge to it; it is a goal that employees perceive as inherently worthwhile. Hence, it implies a sense of destiny. Direction, discovery, and destiny. These are the attributes of strategic intent.” (pp.l29-13O)

Policy Intent

For developing a policy, we need the same kind of strategic approach. I see enormous value in creating a policy intent. Rewriting the above quote in this context gives us this.

Policy intent is our term for an animating dream. It also implies a particular point of view about the long-term position that a department or government of the day hopes to build over the coming decade or so. Hence, it conveys a sense of direction. A strategic intent is differentiated; it implies a unique point of view about the future. It holds out to citizens and the public sector the promise of exploring new territory. Hence, it conveys a sense of discovery. Policy intent has an emotional edge to it; it is a goal that everyone perceives as inherently worthwhile. Hence, it implies a sense of destiny. Direction, discovery, and destiny. These are the attributes of policy intent.” (pp.l29-13O)

As Jeanne Liedke suggests, Strategic thinking is fundamentally concerned with, and driven by, the shaping and re-shaping of intent, often referred to as thinking in time”

7/11/2018

The only real law of history is the law of unintended consequences” — so says finance and economics historian Niall Ferguson.

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3/11/2018

Natural home for energy intensive industry

From AFR, on Mike Cannon Brookes idea of fairdinkumpower.

Ross Garnaut, economics professor at the University of Melbourne and president of SIMEC ZEN Energy, which is building firm renewable power plants for British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta’s Whyalla steel works, said: Unless we muck it up with policy uncertainty and astonishingly bad policy and regulation we are naturally the lowest cost energy producer in the emerging low carbon world economy, and that will make us the natural home for energy intensive industries.”

Professor Garnaut, who first made the clean energy superpower case in 2015, said it could eventually be economic to export power as well.

When the idea showed up first on twitter this is what I said.

For me we have to use this to create a long term economic opportunity. Not just importing. Local tech, local startups and export to the world. We move from exporting coal to exporting renewable energy tech and systems.

Climate change is real. However, where should Australia play?

Not just having solar panel roofs which are imported from China. If we have a 100% renewable energy even then we cannot make a difference to the climate change challenges.

So what can we do?

We create the tech, systems and the energy to enable other countries to become renewable.

That can be exported. It can create significant low carbon emissions that will change the trajectory.

Lets move from solar panel roofs to energy systems for the world.

2/11/2018

This week, I saw no signs that they are.

Damien Cave from NYT.